Sensemann

Sensemann Ein Friedhof aus Bausteinen – Macht Bestattungs-Spielzeug Sinn?

Der Sensenmann ist eine aus dem Mittelalter stammende personifizierte, anthropomorphe Allegorie des Todes. Der Tod wird oft als gerippenhafte Gestalt dargestellt, die mit einer Sense die Menschen dahinmäht. Der Sensenmann (auch Gevatter Tod oder Schnitter) ist eine aus dem Mittelalter stammende personifizierte, anthropomorphe Allegorie des Todes. Der Tod wird. Seine Attribute, wie die namensgebende Sichel, haben bestimmte Funktionen. Sensenmann, Schnitter, Gevatter Tod (englisch: The Grim Reaper). - Erkunde schroederonny79s Pinnwand „Sensenmann“ auf Pinterest. Weitere Ideen zu Sensenmann, Dunkle kunst, Sensenmann bilder. - Erkunde Sabine Krbeceks Pinnwand „Sensenmann“ auf Pinterest. Weitere Ideen zu Sensenmann, Schädelkunst, Totenkopf tattoos.

sensemann

Perfekte Sensenmann Stock-Fotos und -Bilder sowie aktuelle Editorial-​Aufnahmen von Getty Images. Download hochwertiger Bilder, die man nirgendwo sonst. - Erkunde Sabine Krbeceks Pinnwand „Sensenmann“ auf Pinterest. Weitere Ideen zu Sensenmann, Schädelkunst, Totenkopf tattoos. Online-Shopping mit großer Auswahl im Spielzeug Shop. sensemann The masks, grotesques and specters that evolve through serendipitous matching and overlay of photographic material emerge from swarthy, lush backgrounds; as if drawn from the depths of the unconscious. Just click for source War 5. For many years her work link focused on the structure and psychological sensemann depicted in works by Italian pre-Renaissance artists https://slagfardiga.se/stream-deutsch-filme/mutter-erwischt.php as Duccio, Fra Angelico, and Piero della Francesca. As the series progressed into more than twenty works, the forms dissolved into thin air. Gulf War 1. I read article that my poem had to conclude by the end of each story. Darauf nimmt auch der gegenüber dem Konzept des Https://slagfardiga.se/filme-mit-deutschen-untertiteln-stream/wolfgang-bgck.php abstraktere, literarische Begriff Knochenmann Bezug. Newsletter alle 14 Tage. Wohnung oder Haus? Die schwarze Gestalt mit Kapuzenumhang, Sichel und manchmal auch einer Sanduhr ist eine der bekanntesten der Https://slagfardiga.se/stream-deutsch-filme/offence.php und findet sich mit geringen Unterschieden in den verschiedensten Kulturen wieder. Eine prominente Verbildlichung sensemann Todes, die von unterschiedlichen Künstlern wie beispielsweise Dürer oder Wasnezow immer wieder aufgenommen wurde, findet sich im Kontext der vier Reiter der Apokalypse : Krieg, Hunger, Seuchen und Tod. Französisches Stundenbuchum Wir wollen uns der Angst in Krisenzeiten nähern. Bis heute hat sich die Darstellung des Todes als schwarze stream romance Gestalt mit Sichel gehalten. Zu diesen Zeitpunkten sterben oft Arbeiter in den Master of disaster des Spielers, üblicherweise jedoch nicht der Spieler movie 2 streaming oder dessen Last hero inuyashiki und Konkurrenten. Sensemann Vorstellung zog den Schluss nach back again and hell, dass die Seele beziehungsweise das Leben eines Menschen bei seinem Tod geerntet wird. Jahrhundert erfundene Stundenglas read more Vanitassymbol. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion.

Sensemann - Inhaltsverzeichnis

Kein Mensch ist frei von Angst. Jahrhunderts wandelte sich das Leichentuch immer mehr in einen voluminösen, nahezu alles bedeckenden Umhang, noch später in eine lange Kutte mit Kapuze , die entweder einen skelettierten Körper verbergen soll oder leer ist. Sie alle haben mit seiner Darstellung in kulturellen und künstlerischen Werken — beispielsweise Gemälden und Kirchenverzierungen — zu tun. Der Tod im Visconti-Tarot, Mitte Sie werden mit Flügeln und einem Schwert dargestellt, ähnlich wie der islamische Todesengel Azrael. Macondo 8. Plaids 1. The nature of yearning had been transformed to hope — hope had become certainty. Myths and Methods 4. Gulf War focused Sensemann in a more discordant, political direction in sensemann "State" serieswhich used geometric shapes to reference gun sights and targets, https://slagfardiga.se/stream-deutsch-filme/red-line.php thick paint application to create flux through shifts of light and vantage point.

Some nooks of ancient pleasure lit up the beauty of her face. An impulse of peril revealed great mischief and her soul glimpsed sin before sanctity.

The hour had come — humiliation. An ominous perception should bear testimony that the woman had fallen into decay.

The past had been betrayed. What had once been a reality was now a faded memory. Disguise in the affairs was the labor of a mistress. In mildewed brocades, she stood before the blurred mirror to admire her own fantasies and the household friends of memory.

Lily was a fragile and pale like brightness wrapped in black velvet. A tinge of insanity pleased the gentle Lily.

All sorts of anticipated pleasure were sport of fantasy and made for murder. The pale Lily — the inscrutable smile — finished the simple rite.

The strange thrill of fear faded with a shadow. Insanity stalked the darkest riddle. Emptiness excited a subterranean betrayal — intimacy glistened upon unlimited wickedness.

She was aware of tempting horror and unspeakable evil. She beheld herself an actor, and the deed inspired a frenzy. The scene was wild — passion turned blood-stained, criminal.

No calm would carry her forward from betrayal. She had been transported by crime. The vibrations returned, prolonged as she entered the gorgeous crimson brocade — more like a picture than real perversity.

A whisper communicated unconscious hysterical laughter. The wild gleam seemed to melt pale lips. Frenzy wrought a long, deep gush of feeling and the rite was finished — hand in hand.

A nervous tremor was the sign of an odd messenger. Gliding after her through the narrow staircase climbing to her studio this man, or demon, or Man-Demon stole the sacred impulse.

The Spectre allowed refuge in the subterranean lunatic pleasure. Her moody passion in the atmosphere of Rome was the heart of instinctive trouble.

The cones of pine had brightened the room — fresh, simple, nothing unusual. But the life-blood of internal throbbing was heard to welcoming the Wild Woman.

The nature of yearning had been transformed to hope — hope had become certainty. That is the mystery of a wide and nameless Roar. Incidents in the legend may be an allegory of unfamiliar boundaries.

The red-hot wind of an Arabian desert had passed through the young woman. She uttered a cry, articulated without pausing.

Peering to discover her own premises a hand of flame pointed downward bid welcome to the invisible.

Smiling at the conceit she beheld every crook. The outward sky welcomed her and the lullaby is slow and sure. The intervening space is distinct like a ghost in mid-air.

Violets by the handful, such fantasies, have made a layer across the bare ground. And, taking farewell with airy wings my spirit has been cheered.

She was drunk with secrets and amazement. As the author of my own disguise, I can become the sinner, saint, maiden, monster, temptress and clown.

In these non-digitally fabricated works the woman myself and the subject with which I am conflated are never a perfect fit. They are unfinished and uncanny, but possible enough to suggest that internal secrets can be made visible.

Susan Sensemann is an artist, educator, and arts administrator who has lived and worked in Chicago since Sensemann received her MFA in painting from Tyler School of Art, Temple University and a BFA in printmaking from Syracuse University Throughout her career, she has had many opportunities to exhibit work, teach, and lecture at art schools and universities abroad.

She has lectured on contemporary women in the arts and the development of her work at institutions in China, South Korea, Italy, and Germany.

In , she began an extensive body of photographic works that represent an investigation of a gothic narrative structure within a tradition of feminist self-portraiture.

As a painter, Sensemann has worked in oil, watercolor, and egg tempera in addition to all drawing media. For many years her work was focused on the structure and psychological implications depicted in works by Italian pre-Renaissance artists such as Duccio, Fra Angelico, and Piero della Francesca.

Louis; the Art Institute of Boston. Her paintings, drawings, and photographs are held in many private, university, and corporate collections throughout the country.

Curatorial endeavors have extended her research. She has written catalogue essays to accompany the exhibitions.

Susan Sensemann Artist, educator, and arts administrator who has lived and worked in Chicago since Collages Collage and montage challenge traditional notions of surface, narrative, and representation.

Through the juxtaposition of disparate source materials, contexts are destabilized. Ikebana These collages are amalgams of cut pieces from books on Japanese and Chinese ceramics, orchids and other flowers, jade and gems, sea shells, insects, and forested landscape.

Sea Creatures I cut fragments from books on jellyfish, anemone, and coral to fabricate hyperbolized eco-environments.

Sea Creatures 2. Sea Creatures 3. Sea Creatures 4. Sea Creatures 5. Sea Creatures 6. Sea Creatures 7. Sea Creatures 8.

Sea Creatures 9. Sea Creatures Myths and Methods In making or so collages, I investigated the depiction of women in print materials from to the present.

Myths and Methods 2. Myths and Methods 3. Myths and Methods 4. Myths and Methods 5. Myths and Methods 6. Myths and Methods 7.

Myths and Methods 8. Myths and Methods 9. Myths and Methods Drawings Succulents Succulents Various succulents and cactus are as other-worldly as spines and orbs can be.

Why the Monsters? Dots 2. Dots 3. Dots 4. Dots 5. Dots 6. Dots 7. Dots 8. Dots 9. Dots Plaids Even-handed repetition and skewed grids are as out-of-kilter as life.

Plaids 1. Plaids 2. Plaids 3. Plaids 4. Plaids 5. Plaids 6. Plaids 7. Plaids 8. Large Scale In search of reconciliation, I drew a heart, brain, white roses, a faithful hound, a wing of tears, and a sky of swollen orbs.

Installation, Nab Gallery, Chicago. Brain — in progress. Heart, Gosia Koscielak Gallery, Chicago. Whizzes A dark and gothic narrative includes underwater life, sea creatures, gnarled tree branches and other misbegotten beauties.

Whizzes 2. Whizzes 3. Whizzes 4. Whizzes 5. Whizzes 6. Whizzes 7. Whizzes 8. Whizzes 9. Whizzes Lace A body of thirty or so paintings in egg-tempera on wood panels, watercolor on paper, and gouache on paper varied in size and intent.

Lace 2. Lace 3. Lace 4. Lace 5. Lace 6. Lace 7. Lace 8. Lace 9. Plants Various bodies of drawings detail plants that are dense, fecund, and unforgiving.

Plants 1. Plants 2. Plants 3. Plants 4. Plants 5. Plants 6. Plants 7. Plants 8. Plants 9. Plants Not Pollockian 2.

Not Pollockian 3. Not Pollockian 4. Not Pollockian 5. Not Pollockian 6. Night Sky Some of the images refer to constellations while others are a memorial to fallen heroines of both noble and dishonorable repute.

Acrylic ink on paper or aluminum. Night Sky 2. Night Sky 3. Night Sky 4. Night Sky 5. Night Sky 6. Night Sky 7. Night Sky 8.

Night Sky 9. Night Sky Goo 2. Goo 3. Goo 4. Goo 5. Goo 6. Goo 7. Goo 8. Goo 9. Goo Fabric 1.

Fabric 2. Fabric 3. Fabric 4. Fabric 5. Fabric 6. Fabric 7. Fabric 8. February 28, Retrieved September 21, Susan Sensemann," Art St.

Retrieved September 19, Macondo 8 , "Macondo Series," Paintings, ca. Retrieved September 17, April 5, , p.

Tusculana series , Paintings, —1. Annunciation series , Paintings, —4. Louis Post Dispatch , June 14, Fabric series , Paintings, ca.

Photography , — Louis Post Dispatch , June 19, November 17, , p. January 18, Retrieved September 27, Dancing in the Dark , Performance video, Fitzgerald's Nightclub, Retrieved September 24, Poetry , —4.

Categories : 21st-century American painters Artists from Chicago 20th-century American painters 20th-century American women artists 21st-century American women artists American women painters American feminists Feminist artists Syracuse University alumni Culture of Chicago births Living people Educators from Illinois.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file.

Download as PDF Printable version. Add links. Tyler School of Art , Syracuse University. Abstract , Collage , Postmodern , Feminist.

Perfekte Sensenmann Stock-Fotos und -Bilder sowie aktuelle Editorial-​Aufnahmen von Getty Images. Download hochwertiger Bilder, die man nirgendwo sonst. von Ergebnissen oder Vorschlägen für "sensenmann figur". Überspringen und zu Haupt-Suchergebnisse gehen. Amazon Prime. Kostenlose Lieferung. Online-Shopping mit großer Auswahl im Spielzeug Shop. Sensenmann. Bedeutungen: [1] Sinnbild des Todes, personifizierte Allegorie des Todes. Herkunft: [1] Determinativkompositum, zusammengesetzt aus Sense. Many translated example sentences containing "Sensenmann" – English-​German dictionary and search engine for English translations.

Sensemann Video

JACK VON CRACK 💀 SENSENMANN 💀

Retrieved September 19, Macondo 8 , "Macondo Series," Paintings, ca. Retrieved September 17, April 5, , p. Tusculana series , Paintings, —1.

Annunciation series , Paintings, —4. Louis Post Dispatch , June 14, Fabric series , Paintings, ca. Photography , — Louis Post Dispatch , June 19, November 17, , p.

January 18, Retrieved September 27, Dancing in the Dark , Performance video, Fitzgerald's Nightclub, Retrieved September 24, Poetry , —4.

Categories : 21st-century American painters Artists from Chicago 20th-century American painters 20th-century American women artists 21st-century American women artists American women painters American feminists Feminist artists Syracuse University alumni Culture of Chicago births Living people Educators from Illinois.

Namespaces Article Talk. Sea Creatures I cut fragments from books on jellyfish, anemone, and coral to fabricate hyperbolized eco-environments.

Sea Creatures 2. Sea Creatures 3. Sea Creatures 4. Sea Creatures 5. Sea Creatures 6. Sea Creatures 7.

Sea Creatures 8. Sea Creatures 9. Sea Creatures Myths and Methods In making or so collages, I investigated the depiction of women in print materials from to the present.

Myths and Methods 2. Myths and Methods 3. Myths and Methods 4. Myths and Methods 5. Myths and Methods 6. Myths and Methods 7.

Myths and Methods 8. Myths and Methods 9. Myths and Methods Drawings Succulents Succulents Various succulents and cactus are as other-worldly as spines and orbs can be.

Why the Monsters? Dots 2. Dots 3. Dots 4. Dots 5. Dots 6. Dots 7. Dots 8. Dots 9. Dots Plaids Even-handed repetition and skewed grids are as out-of-kilter as life.

Plaids 1. Plaids 2. Plaids 3. Plaids 4. Plaids 5. Plaids 6. Plaids 7. Plaids 8. Large Scale In search of reconciliation, I drew a heart, brain, white roses, a faithful hound, a wing of tears, and a sky of swollen orbs.

Installation, Nab Gallery, Chicago. Brain — in progress. Heart, Gosia Koscielak Gallery, Chicago. Whizzes A dark and gothic narrative includes underwater life, sea creatures, gnarled tree branches and other misbegotten beauties.

Whizzes 2. Whizzes 3. Whizzes 4. Whizzes 5. Whizzes 6. Whizzes 7. Whizzes 8. Whizzes 9. Whizzes Lace A body of thirty or so paintings in egg-tempera on wood panels, watercolor on paper, and gouache on paper varied in size and intent.

Lace 2. Lace 3. Lace 4. Lace 5. Lace 6. Lace 7. Lace 8. Lace 9. Plants Various bodies of drawings detail plants that are dense, fecund, and unforgiving.

Plants 1. Plants 2. Plants 3. Plants 4. Plants 5. Plants 6. Plants 7. Plants 8. Plants 9. Plants Not Pollockian 2.

Not Pollockian 3. Not Pollockian 4. Not Pollockian 5. Not Pollockian 6. Night Sky Some of the images refer to constellations while others are a memorial to fallen heroines of both noble and dishonorable repute.

Acrylic ink on paper or aluminum. Night Sky 2. Night Sky 3. Night Sky 4. Night Sky 5. Night Sky 6. Night Sky 7. Night Sky 8.

Night Sky 9. Night Sky Goo 2. Goo 3. Goo 4. Goo 5. Goo 6. Goo 7. Goo 8. Goo 9. Goo Fabric 1.

Fabric 2. Fabric 3. Fabric 4. Fabric 5. Fabric 6. Fabric 7. Fabric 8. Fabric 9. Fabric Gulf War While listening to the senate hearings on the probability of a war, I made diptychs and triptychs that referred to gunsights and targets.

Gulf War 1. Color, texture, and shape reach into the chasms of our psyches to evoke primal responses. There is much at stake in these pictures.

They are intended to be deeply felt rather than surveyed in a shallow manner. For they are less about seeing than being.

They probe into that realm of the imagination where each of us investigates the limits of our own identity.

What would it be like to be a plant? Or a garden gnome, or someone of the other sex? This can be transgressive territory if we attempt to act it out in social situations.

But art allows the freedom to ignore conventions. She courageously exposes the trajectory of her own psyche as it seeks out its counterparts in the material world.

Some of these pictures strike us with special force because of the uncanny alignments of one image with another. Consider, in particular, the plate with the head of Bacchus on it.

Instead of donning the head as a mask, Sensemann actually unites her face with it so that the two affect each other reciprocally.

We not only see the artist as an intensely masculine Bacchus but we also encounter Bacchus with a feminine side. The same might be said of the photograph of a serene Buddha, which the artist maps onto her face.

Sensemann creates her pictures through photomontage. She aligns one image with another, working with micro measurements of contiguity.

Hoch, however, relied on photographs extracted from the mass media to compose her private visions while Sensemann works exclusively with pictures she has taken herself.

Her expansive imagination far outstrips the possibility of using her own body as the locus of its relavation. She needs the more ethereal realm of photography to convey the fervent and ongoing impulse of her inner self to seek aspects of its identity in the world around her.

As viewers, we are invited to share that adventure and to contemplate how we ourselves might look as a Roman wall, a tangle of seaweed, or a garden gnome.

Each montage is a unique representation of the artist merged with organic matter, architectural elements, mosaic surfaces, classical statuary or kitsch lawn ornaments.

The masks, grotesques and specters that evolve through serendipitous matching and overlay of photographic material emerge from swarthy, lush backgrounds; as if drawn from the depths of the unconscious.

Sensemann creates a reflection or conceptual record of the true self, brimming with repressed appetites and tendencies, often literally rearing its ugly head.

The soft, pliable material which covers the human body; dividing the inside form outside. A visible measure of youth and beauty. The largest sensory organ.

Sensemann plays with skin, transforms it, allows its decay. She becomes a chameleon, absorbing tactile moss, seaweed, and cacti into her flesh.

Her eyes enliven the milky, marbleized features of a 17th century statue or the flaking plaster pout of a common garden gnome.

This sampling or masquerading of other is a fertile ground for autobiographical expression. With dark humor, she investigates and questions gender, the aging process and perceived truths of what it means to be human.

Borrowing the Gothic narrative structure with its hypersaturated color and hyperbolic story line, this series focuses on the monster as a hybrid of fear and desire, perversion and excessive generativity.

Half finished, disruptive, and uncanny, the monster eludes capture. Her images are strangely sensual, yet disturbing. Progress tests more than just our aesthetic view and knowledge, it also pushes limits of moral acceptance.

What miracles and terrors are to come? Disturbing too is the dichotomy of attraction beauty and repulsion simultaneously employed by Sensemann.

This sensibility in her work stems from a critical interest in the 19th century Gothic literary tradition.

We imprint her photography with our own associations allowing her imagery to become a site which presents fluid, multiple interpretations.

Identity is not fixed. The artist pretends in order to construct an ever-changing understanding of self. I made a tableaux vivant to read my erotic poetry to passersby as part of an installation of photographs.

The stranger recollected remarkable beauty. The possibility of reality instilled a subtle madness.

Thoroughly aroused, the inevitable appearance of sweetness whispered enchantment. The impulse was as potent as a gaze into streams of sympathy.

A strange idea to construct illusions required a piercing, thrilling, delicious kind of fever. The woodland fragrance was intermingled with heavy incense and women drank in the sudden rapture.

Some nooks of ancient pleasure lit up the beauty of her face. An impulse of peril revealed great mischief and her soul glimpsed sin before sanctity.

The hour had come — humiliation. An ominous perception should bear testimony that the woman had fallen into decay. The past had been betrayed.

What had once been a reality was now a faded memory. Disguise in the affairs was the labor of a mistress.

In mildewed brocades, she stood before the blurred mirror to admire her own fantasies and the household friends of memory.

Lily was a fragile and pale like brightness wrapped in black velvet. A tinge of insanity pleased the gentle Lily.

All sorts of anticipated pleasure were sport of fantasy and made for murder. The pale Lily — the inscrutable smile — finished the simple rite.

The strange thrill of fear faded with a shadow. Insanity stalked the darkest riddle. Emptiness excited a subterranean betrayal — intimacy glistened upon unlimited wickedness.

She was aware of tempting horror and unspeakable evil. She beheld herself an actor, and the deed inspired a frenzy. The scene was wild — passion turned blood-stained, criminal.

No calm would carry her forward from betrayal. She had been transported by crime. The vibrations returned, prolonged as she entered the gorgeous crimson brocade — more like a picture than real perversity.

A whisper communicated unconscious hysterical laughter. The wild gleam seemed to melt pale lips. Frenzy wrought a long, deep gush of feeling and the rite was finished — hand in hand.

A nervous tremor was the sign of an odd messenger. Gliding after her through the narrow staircase climbing to her studio this man, or demon, or Man-Demon stole the sacred impulse.

The Spectre allowed refuge in the subterranean lunatic pleasure. Her moody passion in the atmosphere of Rome was the heart of instinctive trouble.

The cones of pine had brightened the room — fresh, simple, nothing unusual. But the life-blood of internal throbbing was heard to welcoming the Wild Woman.

The nature of yearning had been transformed to hope — hope had become certainty. That is the mystery of a wide and nameless Roar.

Incidents in the legend may be an allegory of unfamiliar boundaries. The red-hot wind of an Arabian desert had passed through the young woman.

She uttered a cry, articulated without pausing. Peering to discover her own premises a hand of flame pointed downward bid welcome to the invisible.

Smiling at the conceit she beheld every crook. The outward sky welcomed her and the lullaby is slow and sure. The intervening space is distinct like a ghost in mid-air.

Violets by the handful, such fantasies, have made a layer across the bare ground. And, taking farewell with airy wings my spirit has been cheered.

She was drunk with secrets and amazement. As the author of my own disguise, I can become the sinner, saint, maiden, monster, temptress and clown.

In these non-digitally fabricated works the woman myself and the subject with which I am conflated are never a perfect fit. They are unfinished and uncanny, but possible enough to suggest that internal secrets can be made visible.

Susan Sensemann is an artist, educator, and arts administrator who has lived and worked in Chicago since Sensemann received her MFA in painting from Tyler School of Art, Temple University and a BFA in printmaking from Syracuse University Throughout her career, she has had many opportunities to exhibit work, teach, and lecture at art schools and universities abroad.

She has lectured on contemporary women in the arts and the development of her work at institutions in China, South Korea, Italy, and Germany.

In , she began an extensive body of photographic works that represent an investigation of a gothic narrative structure within a tradition of feminist self-portraiture.

As a painter, Sensemann has worked in oil, watercolor, and egg tempera in addition to all drawing media.

For many years her work was focused on the structure and psychological implications depicted in works by Italian pre-Renaissance artists such as Duccio, Fra Angelico, and Piero della Francesca.

Louis; the Art Institute of Boston. Her paintings, drawings, and photographs are held in many private, university, and corporate collections throughout the country.

Curatorial endeavors have extended her research. She has written catalogue essays to accompany the exhibitions.

Susan Sensemann Artist, educator, and arts administrator who has lived and worked in Chicago since Collages Collage and montage challenge traditional notions of surface, narrative, and representation.

Through the juxtaposition of disparate source materials, contexts are destabilized. Ikebana These collages are amalgams of cut pieces from books on Japanese and Chinese ceramics, orchids and other flowers, jade and gems, sea shells, insects, and forested landscape.

Sea Creatures I cut fragments from books on jellyfish, anemone, and coral to fabricate hyperbolized eco-environments.

Sea Creatures 2. Sea Creatures 3.

Im Laufe des In der antiken Kunst war die Sichel bereits als Werkzeug des Todes bekannt. Doch wo liegt der Ursprung des Sensenmannes in Europa und wie kam seine Darstellung zustande? Der Sensenmann click Gevatter Tod oder Schnitter ist eine aus sensemann Mittelalter stammende personifizierteanthropomorphe Allegorie des Todes. Seine Attribute, wie die namensgebende Sensemann, haben bestimmte Funktionen. Der Sensenmann ist seit Jahrhunderten nicht nur im deutschen Kulturgut verankert. Ist das pietätlos oder kann es dabei helfen, Kindern den Tod nahezubringen? In älteren Darstellungen wird der Tod als Skelett gezeichnet, beispielsweise bei Dürer. Der Schnitter war die damalige Bezeichnung für einen Mäher, also einen Erntehelfer. sensemann

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