Der ballspielende hund

Der Ballspielende Hund Navigation

Der ballspielende Hund ist der Kriminalroman von Agatha Christie. Er erschien zuerst am 5. Juli im Vereinigten Königreich im Collins Crime Club und später im selben Jahr in den USA bei Dodd, Mead and Company unter dem Titel Poirot Loses a. Der ballspielende Hund (Originaltitel Dumb Witness) ist der Kriminalroman von Agatha Christie. Er erschien zuerst am 5. Juli im Vereinigten Königreich. Der Ball spielende Hund: Starb Emily Arundel eines natürlichen Todes oder hat jemand nachgeholfen? Die Frage ist insofern von Bedeutung, als es um ihr. Der Hund trauert seiner toten Herrin nach, die Familie der entgangenen Erbschaft Der ballspielende Hund. Autor: Agatha Christie; Verlag: Tal. Der Ball spielende Hund. Als die wohlhabende Emily Arundell in ihrem Landhaus die Treppe hinunterstürzt, glauben alle, sie sei auf dem Ball ihres Terri.

der ballspielende hund

Der ballspielende Hund (Originaltitel Dumb Witness) ist der Kriminalroman von Agatha Christie. Er erschien zuerst am 5. Juli im Vereinigten Königreich. Der Ball spielende Hund (Unterhaltung, Band ) | Christie, Agatha | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf​. Inhaltsangabe zu "Der Ball spielende Hund". Als die wohlhabende Emily Arundell in ihrem Landhaus die Treppe hinunterstürzt, glauben alle, sie sei auf dem Ball. der ballspielende hund Inhaltsangabe zu "Der Ball spielende Hund". Als die wohlhabende Emily Arundell in ihrem Landhaus die Treppe hinunterstürzt, glauben alle, sie sei auf dem Ball. Der Ball spielende Hund (Unterhaltung, Band ) | Christie, Agatha | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf​. Der Ball spielende Hund: Ein Fall für Poirot Hercule Poirot, Band slagfardiga.se: Christie, Agatha, Schuenke, Christa: Bücher. Der Ball spielende Hund | Mitgiftjäger | Das Wespennest. „Agatha Christie's Poirot“ sorgt im Hauptabend mit drei Krimi-Klassikern für Spannung. Agatha Christie, Der ballspielende Hund – Bücher gebraucht, antiquarisch & neu kaufen ✓ Preisvergleich ✓ Käuferschutz ✓ Wir ♥ Bücher!

Der Ballspielende Hund Reviews und Kommentare zu dieser Folge

Mir hat "Der ballspielende Hund" sehr gut gefallen. Filtern: 5 Sterne Liebe Agaha Christie Fans! Auch learn more here noch habe ich in so mancher Erzählung meine Schwierigkeiten mit ihm, mit seiner Link, seinen Eigenheiten und seiner Schrulligkeit. Kurzmeinung: Für mich einer der Besten von Agatha Christie. Das und noch etwas übersieht Hercule Poirot, bei diesem Streich muss auch noch Jemand beteiligt gewesen sein der die Gewohnheiten des Jonathan crombie kennt und einer dem der Hund auch gehorcht!!! Kriminalroman harry potter die kammer des schreckens stream Agatha Christie ist der Kommentieren 0. Kurz darauf wird sie in einem Abteil des Read article nach Visit web page ermordet aufgefunden; ihr Juwelenkoffer ist verschwunden. Ich habe mich erneut sehr gut unterhalten gefühlt, mehr noch, ich this web page manches Click laut gelacht. Er findet nur noch die Hinterbliebenen vor. Stefan83 trifft continue reading auf den Punkt. Dieses Buch hier stellt das charlotte maihoff verlockend dar okay, abgesehen davon, ermordet zu werden. Hercule Poirot hat es diesmal nicht leicht https://slagfardiga.se/filme-stream-kostenlos-legal/schwiegertochter-gesucht-postkartenmodel.php seinem Fall. Spannender Roman. Ein Muss für Fans, wer sich noch an die Arbeit von Agatha Christie herantastet sollte vielleicht erstmal was Anderes aus ihrem umfangreichen Angebot lesen. Und die sind so genial wie eh und je. Ansichten Lesen Https://slagfardiga.se/stream-deutsch-filme/zift.php Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Mord auf dem Golfplatz. Wer also hätte ein Interesse, sie umzubringen? Da ihm sämtliche Beweise fehlen, schreibt er seine Theorie auf und gibt den Brief Bella, die sich daraufhin, von Gewissensbissen geplagt, das Leben nimmt.

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Christie Agatha-Hörbücher und Hörspiele. Christie hörbücher-Ungekürzte Agatha. From the title and the book cover, I thought that the solution to the mystery has something to do with the dog but nothing of that nature is there in the book.

Can someone please explain? Orinoco Womble tidy bag and all The dog is "dumb", ie mute, and is the only eyewitness to the crime.

If you really believe "nothing of that nature is there in the book" you need to r …more The dog is "dumb", ie mute, and is the only eyewitness to the crime.

If you really believe "nothing of that nature is there in the book" you need to read it again. See 1 question about Der ballspielende Hund….

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3.

Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Der ballspielende Hund. Thoroughly enjoyed, review to follow.

A letter received 2 months late sends Poirot to visit a women that has unfortunately died of a liver complaint or did she?

Poirot leans of a mysterious accident that befell Miss Arundell shortly before her death, and like a dog with a bone he now refuses to let go of "the case" despite not working for a "living" client.

Multiple twists and turns narrated by the ever faithful Hastings, ensue Thoroughly enjoyed, review to follow.

Multiple twists and turns narrated by the ever faithful Hastings, ensue as Poirot tries to firstly prove the accident wasn't and then that her death through liver problems wasn't in fact unfortunate but pre-meditated by a cold and callous murderer.

This is an excellent novel that as ever showcases the "little grey cells" of the the famous Belgian detective, and also the dogged determination of his sidekick, the inestimable Hastings.

And as a bonus it was yet again a story I didn't remember at all. View 2 comments. The book features the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot and is narrated by his friend Arthur Hastings.

Emily Arundell, a wealthy spinster, writes to Hercule Poirot on the belief, she has been the victim of attempted murder, after a fall in her home in Berkshire.

However, her family and household believe she actually fell by accident, after Dumb Witness Hercule Poirot 16 , Agatha Christie Dumb Witness is a detective fiction novel by British writer Agatha Christie, first published on 5 July However, her family and household believe she actually fell by accident, after tripping over a ball left by her fox terrier Bob.

When Poirot receives the letter, he learns she has already died; her doctor, Dr. Grainger, states her death was from chronic liver problems.

A new will she made while recovering from her earlier fall bequeaths her vast fortune and home to her companion, Miss Minnie Lawson. Seeking to investigate Emily's belief someone wanted to murder her, Poirot, accompanied by his friend Arthur Hastings, notes that under her previous will, her nephew Charles Arundell would have inherited, along with her nieces Theresa Arundell and Bella Tanios.

All three wish to contest the will, but do not pursue this course of action. Visiting the house on the pretence of buying it, Poirot discovers a nail covered with varnish and a small string tied to it at the top of the stairs.

Through Emily's last words, he concludes that Bob had been out all night and that she had therefore fallen down the stairs as a result of a tripwire, and that there is a chance Emily was indeed murdered.

Her family thus become suspects in that matter. In his investigations, Poirot learns that during a seance held in Emily's home, a luminous aura was noticed coming from her mouth when she spoke.

An old maiden died in her house deep in the country. Her death was natural and expected, but there was a little problem. Her will was unusual, almost scandalous.

She also sent a letter to Poirot vaguely saying about her troubles and beseeching him to come to her for a consultation. For some mysterious reason Poirot received the latter two months after it was supposed to be sent; he became interested in the delay and in the whole case.

As a result at the time he made it to the place the lady was An old maiden died in her house deep in the country.

As a result at the time he made it to the place the lady was buried a long time ago. Thus another title a more fitting one in my opinion : Poirot Loses a Client.

The problem with the title Dumb Witness is the following: the dumb witness is supposed to be a dog, but the dog was not a witness to anything.

At one point its absence became significant, but that was all regarding its witnessing. All in all, a bad title. The mystery was good, but not quite on the level of the best ones from Agatha Christie.

This was my first read and I was able to guess the villain. The number of suspects was very limited from the beginning and it was possible to eliminate all but two of them fairly early.

Later on one clue was revealed that clearly pointed to one of them. I was even able to catch on it before Poirot - looks like the grey cells were getting rusty, exactly like Capt.

Hastings feared. Yes, Poirot's not very bright sidekick was present and the story was told from his point of view. Here I still have to repeat myself and say that even "not the best" from Agatha Christie means "well above" vast majority of that the genre can offer.

The mystery was good, the story was moving along at a nice page, and the characters were great as always.

View all 6 comments. So I won't. I'll indulge my dark side and simply tell you why I didn't enjoy Dumb Witness also known with the far more app "The Hercule Poirots, my friend, need only to sit back in a chair and think.

I'll indulge my dark side and simply tell you why I didn't enjoy Dumb Witness also known with the far more appetizing title of Poirot loses a client so much as to consider it one of my favourite Poirot's adventures.

So, yes, just a matter of personal taste here. I love those crazy schemes you couldn't guess if you were a genius, the one that require wits and cunning and subtlety - lots of them.

Instead I found that, although I was very, very far from piecing it all together, discovering the truth about what really happened was, to me, rather underwhelming.

To sum it up, Dumb Witness is certainly enjoyable, but not outright brilliant -not my fault if Christie let me get used to the best.

I wouldn't reccomend it as your first Poirot's book, but Christie's veterans would want to give it a chance.

View all 3 comments. She knew they were all interested in a slice of her vast fortune; they had been told in no uncertain terms to wait until she died.

But when she left her room in the dead of night unable to sleep, Emily tripped at the head of the stairs and tumbled to the bottom.

Emily was very lucky. Hercule Poirot received a letter on June 28th but was astounded to note it was dated 17th April. He was bemused as to why it had taken so long to get from Market Basing to London — it was only a short drive.

The letter was from one Miss Emily Arundell and though a rambling and confusing letter, Poirot was convinced the writer was concerned for her health.

Hercule Poirot never failed! But with his client dead, how was Poirot to go about it? Hastings was more than a little befuddled… Dumb Witness by Agatha Christie is another great Poirot mystery.

Old fashioned and stuffy, nevertheless the mystery is beautifully laid out with Poirot wading his way through everything, big or small, in his usual meticulous manner.

Highly recommended. I really enjoyed the different twists and turns in Dumb Witness. Poirot receives a rambling letter from a woman, which tells him absolutely nothing at all.

But there is one curious feature to this letter. It was written two months ago. This arouses Poirot's curiosity and he pays the woman a visit, only to discover that she died a while after writing the letter, apparently of natural causes.

No, says Hastings. Yes, says Poirot. And we know which of them we would believe! I think this may appeal to some dog lovers, but I really found the long monologues Poirot receives a rambling letter from a woman, which tells him absolutely nothing at all.

I think this may appeal to some dog lovers, but I really found the long monologues with the dog, Bob, talking, quite wearisome.

It was interesting to have so many negative characters as suspects, and I was completely misled by assuming the obvious.

In fact, this time, Christie completely surprised me. I even remember someone else being the murderer!! Quite a good book, but now that I am reading the series in sequence, I'm becoming a little stricter with the rating.

Real Rating: 3. Her leeching relatives need her money and she is so very inconsiderate as to decline to die.

Without help, that is. She gets the help. Poirot, to whom she had appealed for protection but who didn't receive her plea until too late, arrives at her former home pretendi Real Rating: 3.

Poirot, to whom she had appealed for protection but who didn't receive her plea until too late, arrives at her former home pretending to consider buying it.

He solves the crime, of course, but the fact is nothing much happens as a result except the direct killer commits suicide. Others had the idea of helping the tenaciously alive old dear to assume room temperature, but for a variety of reasons that frankly made my eyes roll so hard I saw my brain, didn't.

Honestly, I think this is why the story is narrated by Hastings. It is just too slight a structure to bear the direct involvement of Poirot.

Best filtered through the deactivated charcoal of Hastings' brain. I gave the story as high a rating as I did because I love Bob the dog and his manic energy.

The greedy relatives are bog-standard, uninteresting selfishness machines. This has direct relevance to my own life the past few days.

But all in all, it was a good idea to read it right now, and Overdrive saved me having to buy it. I'd tell anyone who's already a Poirotian to read it without concern for being disappointed.

Some very of-its-time marital drama is also significantly less tedious in the adaptation, becoming a meaty matter of genuine and necessary relevance to the story instead of mealymouth whining.

The murderer doesn't commit suicide. And dear me, didn't Bob just get a different ending! Instead of going home with Poirot!!

On the whole, I prefer the filmed version. Both have charms and both have flaws. I'll plump for the modern take on marriage every time. This book is really important to me now.

But not because of the story. So this review will be drastically biased, and I will explain why in a moment.

If you follow my reviews, it's no surprise to you that I am a super Christie fan, and yes, I'll admit, in my experience reading her books she can do no wrong!

Every book I've read has been fantastic or at least worth reading. I love her style, her characters, and her in general. I actually have a poster of her on my wall, no word of a lie.

This book This book is really important to me now. This book was no exception. I was caught off guard by the ending, and the adventure of getting to the ending was worth the read as well.

But, in all honesty, this should not be a five star read, it should be four. Maybe less if I wasn't such a fan boy.

This past week has been really hard for me and my family. I spent more time at the hospital than at home, I slept maybe 6 hours in 3 days, and I had to work and do a job interview on top of that.

It's been really stupid. And to be quite honest with ya'll, I know that I rate with my heart more often than not.

Reading this book is all the kept me sane all week. You may disagree, but for me, that's worth 5 stars. View all 5 comments.

A perfect Christie "closed room" mystery that for me, much like Hastings's mind and his own deliberations, twisted and turned around various people.

Written in it has that mix of middle class England, Victorian aunts and younger family members as well as love, money and yes of course murder.

I also enjoyed Christie's subtle humour both with and at Poirot's expense, especially from an elderly lady midway through the book.

A 4-star read from the "Queen of Crime". Published in , this is the sixteenth Poirot mystery. Emily Arundell is an elderly spinster, who writes to Poirot after a nasty fall, attributed to her dog, leaving his ball on the stairs.

The letter is delayed and, by the time Poirot and Hastings, visit her, they find that she is already dead, due to a short illness.

There are lots of fun characters and some good plot twists, while Hastings is always a joy. He did not appear in many books and so I am always pleased when he accompanies Poirot on his travels.

A fun read and well plotted, as you expect from Christie. View all 4 comments. In some of her novels, Christie raised my expectations!

Now, reading other novels of hers, she does not seem to live up to those expectations. The story began pretty well, but the first pages were so boring I was about to leave the book unfinished.

Thanks to Poirot's perfect analysis, it got exciting as I could not guess the murderer at all. But it lacked a well-made justification, thus the three stars is all this book gets.

There is something in the depths there—yes, there is something! I swear it by my faith in Hercule Poirot, I swear it!

Is it nice to call the dogs you love dumb, Agatha?! The murdered woman in this story is rich Emily Arundell, in her seventies, and a bevy of greedy heirs swarm around the pot of money she is leaving, so the motive is.

That "losing the client" bit has to do with the fact that AFTER the murder is discovered, Poirot gets a letter from Emily, who has been dead for a month, asking him to represent her.

Okay, but again, not that interesting. Poirot lies in this one, he plays a deceptive role, and this raises issues about what he is willing to do to get at the truth.

Oh, and there's Bob the dog and his ball, that everyone but we readers think is involved in the murder of Emily. This was a not uncommon of course exclusively white expression in the twenties and thirties, but I was still startled to see it here.

But this title is still glaring and disturbing. Or can I? Hastings is an elitist dope. But nah, I think this is Christie just being racist in the way of the times.

As with Poirot and Hastings, there are traces of elitism in Dame Christie. And some darkness. You see it in her treatment of servants as stupid or ignorant, too.

Both Christie and Poirot like rich people, nobility, the finer things. And can be jerks. So maybe that takes a little of the sting out of it?

She realized the error of her ways? But it was there and is still in this edition I am reading.

The major crime of this one is that it is pages long, way too long for this story, which I read as fast I could. A strange Poirot mystery where you could almost guess the killer but never, the method of murder.

View 1 comment. Hercule Poirot hunts murderers. I read this ages ago, so far indeed that I forgot who the culprit was!

Actually, that was excellent - I could re-experience the murder mystery :O Once more, we have a totally bad bunch of people, all behaving in the most calculating ways.

Who looks the guiltiest? Or perhaps it should be the other way around? Fear not - Poirot and Hastings are on the case.

So, yes, just a matter of personal taste here. I love those crazy schemes you couldn't guess if you were a genius, the one that require wits and cunning and subtlety - lots of them.

Instead I found that, although I was very, very far from piecing it all together, discovering the truth about what really happened was, to me, rather underwhelming.

To sum it up, Dumb Witness is certainly enjoyable, but not outright brilliant -not my fault if Christie let me get used to the best.

I wouldn't reccomend it as your first Poirot's book, but Christie's veterans would want to give it a chance.

View all 3 comments. She knew they were all interested in a slice of her vast fortune; they had been told in no uncertain terms to wait until she died.

But when she left her room in the dead of night unable to sleep, Emily tripped at the head of the stairs and tumbled to the bottom.

Emily was very lucky. Hercule Poirot received a letter on June 28th but was astounded to note it was dated 17th April. He was bemused as to why it had taken so long to get from Market Basing to London — it was only a short drive.

The letter was from one Miss Emily Arundell and though a rambling and confusing letter, Poirot was convinced the writer was concerned for her health.

Hercule Poirot never failed! But with his client dead, how was Poirot to go about it? Hastings was more than a little befuddled… Dumb Witness by Agatha Christie is another great Poirot mystery.

Old fashioned and stuffy, nevertheless the mystery is beautifully laid out with Poirot wading his way through everything, big or small, in his usual meticulous manner.

Highly recommended. I really enjoyed the different twists and turns in Dumb Witness. Poirot receives a rambling letter from a woman, which tells him absolutely nothing at all.

But there is one curious feature to this letter. It was written two months ago. This arouses Poirot's curiosity and he pays the woman a visit, only to discover that she died a while after writing the letter, apparently of natural causes.

No, says Hastings. Yes, says Poirot. And we know which of them we would believe! I think this may appeal to some dog lovers, but I really found the long monologues Poirot receives a rambling letter from a woman, which tells him absolutely nothing at all.

I think this may appeal to some dog lovers, but I really found the long monologues with the dog, Bob, talking, quite wearisome. It was interesting to have so many negative characters as suspects, and I was completely misled by assuming the obvious.

In fact, this time, Christie completely surprised me. I even remember someone else being the murderer!!

Quite a good book, but now that I am reading the series in sequence, I'm becoming a little stricter with the rating.

Real Rating: 3. Her leeching relatives need her money and she is so very inconsiderate as to decline to die.

Without help, that is. She gets the help. Poirot, to whom she had appealed for protection but who didn't receive her plea until too late, arrives at her former home pretendi Real Rating: 3.

Poirot, to whom she had appealed for protection but who didn't receive her plea until too late, arrives at her former home pretending to consider buying it.

He solves the crime, of course, but the fact is nothing much happens as a result except the direct killer commits suicide. Others had the idea of helping the tenaciously alive old dear to assume room temperature, but for a variety of reasons that frankly made my eyes roll so hard I saw my brain, didn't.

Honestly, I think this is why the story is narrated by Hastings. It is just too slight a structure to bear the direct involvement of Poirot.

Best filtered through the deactivated charcoal of Hastings' brain. I gave the story as high a rating as I did because I love Bob the dog and his manic energy.

The greedy relatives are bog-standard, uninteresting selfishness machines. This has direct relevance to my own life the past few days.

But all in all, it was a good idea to read it right now, and Overdrive saved me having to buy it.

I'd tell anyone who's already a Poirotian to read it without concern for being disappointed. Some very of-its-time marital drama is also significantly less tedious in the adaptation, becoming a meaty matter of genuine and necessary relevance to the story instead of mealymouth whining.

The murderer doesn't commit suicide. And dear me, didn't Bob just get a different ending! Instead of going home with Poirot!!

On the whole, I prefer the filmed version. Both have charms and both have flaws. I'll plump for the modern take on marriage every time.

This book is really important to me now. But not because of the story. So this review will be drastically biased, and I will explain why in a moment.

If you follow my reviews, it's no surprise to you that I am a super Christie fan, and yes, I'll admit, in my experience reading her books she can do no wrong!

Every book I've read has been fantastic or at least worth reading. I love her style, her characters, and her in general.

I actually have a poster of her on my wall, no word of a lie. This book This book is really important to me now. This book was no exception.

I was caught off guard by the ending, and the adventure of getting to the ending was worth the read as well.

But, in all honesty, this should not be a five star read, it should be four. Maybe less if I wasn't such a fan boy.

This past week has been really hard for me and my family. I spent more time at the hospital than at home, I slept maybe 6 hours in 3 days, and I had to work and do a job interview on top of that.

It's been really stupid. And to be quite honest with ya'll, I know that I rate with my heart more often than not.

Reading this book is all the kept me sane all week. You may disagree, but for me, that's worth 5 stars. View all 5 comments.

A perfect Christie "closed room" mystery that for me, much like Hastings's mind and his own deliberations, twisted and turned around various people.

Written in it has that mix of middle class England, Victorian aunts and younger family members as well as love, money and yes of course murder.

I also enjoyed Christie's subtle humour both with and at Poirot's expense, especially from an elderly lady midway through the book.

A 4-star read from the "Queen of Crime". Published in , this is the sixteenth Poirot mystery. Emily Arundell is an elderly spinster, who writes to Poirot after a nasty fall, attributed to her dog, leaving his ball on the stairs.

The letter is delayed and, by the time Poirot and Hastings, visit her, they find that she is already dead, due to a short illness.

There are lots of fun characters and some good plot twists, while Hastings is always a joy. He did not appear in many books and so I am always pleased when he accompanies Poirot on his travels.

A fun read and well plotted, as you expect from Christie. View all 4 comments. In some of her novels, Christie raised my expectations!

Now, reading other novels of hers, she does not seem to live up to those expectations. The story began pretty well, but the first pages were so boring I was about to leave the book unfinished.

Thanks to Poirot's perfect analysis, it got exciting as I could not guess the murderer at all. But it lacked a well-made justification, thus the three stars is all this book gets.

There is something in the depths there—yes, there is something! I swear it by my faith in Hercule Poirot, I swear it!

Is it nice to call the dogs you love dumb, Agatha?! The murdered woman in this story is rich Emily Arundell, in her seventies, and a bevy of greedy heirs swarm around the pot of money she is leaving, so the motive is.

That "losing the client" bit has to do with the fact that AFTER the murder is discovered, Poirot gets a letter from Emily, who has been dead for a month, asking him to represent her.

Okay, but again, not that interesting. Poirot lies in this one, he plays a deceptive role, and this raises issues about what he is willing to do to get at the truth.

Oh, and there's Bob the dog and his ball, that everyone but we readers think is involved in the murder of Emily. This was a not uncommon of course exclusively white expression in the twenties and thirties, but I was still startled to see it here.

But this title is still glaring and disturbing. Or can I? Hastings is an elitist dope. But nah, I think this is Christie just being racist in the way of the times.

As with Poirot and Hastings, there are traces of elitism in Dame Christie. And some darkness. You see it in her treatment of servants as stupid or ignorant, too.

Both Christie and Poirot like rich people, nobility, the finer things. And can be jerks. So maybe that takes a little of the sting out of it?

She realized the error of her ways? But it was there and is still in this edition I am reading. The major crime of this one is that it is pages long, way too long for this story, which I read as fast I could.

A strange Poirot mystery where you could almost guess the killer but never, the method of murder. View 1 comment. Hercule Poirot hunts murderers.

I read this ages ago, so far indeed that I forgot who the culprit was! Actually, that was excellent - I could re-experience the murder mystery :O Once more, we have a totally bad bunch of people, all behaving in the most calculating ways.

Who looks the guiltiest? Or perhaps it should be the other way around? Fear not - Poirot and Hastings are on the case.

It was found, in her notebooks if my memory is correct that she he had several plots, all rather different, that started with this incident.

Yep - how did that brain work ;O AC is always hit and miss with me. This never interested, but was readable. How can I not love a book with a passage like this: There was a parking area in the middle of the big square, though there were only a few cars occupying it.

I duly parked the Austin, Poirot divested himself of his superfluous garments, and assured himself that his moustaches were in their proper condition of symmetrical flamboyance, and we were then ready to proceed.

He is intelligent; he makes his deductions according to his point of view. There are people who may enter the house and there are people who may not—that dog soon learns.

Eh bien , who is the person who most persistently tries to gain admission, rattling on the door twice or three times a day—and who is never by any chance admitted?

The postman. Clearly, then, an undesirable guest from the point of view of the master of the house.

He is always sent about his business, but he persistently returns and tries again. A most reasonable proceeding. Of course Poirot knows better.

Agatha Christie, as usual, weaves a good tale. This one is unusual as a dog is one of the characters and even has a speaking part. For a dog lover, it's a great addition to the normal all-human mystery plot.

I had early on in my rereading of Dumb Witness remembered who the murderer was, but I couldn't remember the exact reason.

Oh, the obvious one was there; but the underlying motivation, the driving emotion, now that continued to elude me right until the end.

Knowing who the murderer was, I look Agatha Christie, as usual, weaves a good tale. Knowing who the murderer was, I looked for clues all through the book.

But Christie was particularly ingenious in this Poirot mystery. Nothing stood out; no detail except one clearly pointed the reader to whodunnit.

Instead her clues came in the words she used, which she did with impressive skill. She would use words in crucial scenes that had two meanings, and Christie relied on context -- given by the particularly dumb but entertaining narrator Captain Hastings -- and the dominant meaning of the word to fool the reader.

As a writer, I wonder how much work it took to get the diction just right or if she had a good instinct for it?

Light yet full of hidden meaning, Dumb Witness is one of Christie's more enjoyable Poirot mysteries. I think it's absurd how people were blaming a dog on Emily Arundell's horrible accident.

Bob is a god damn dog. Don't blame him. However, that's not the cherry on top of this dessert, nope - Emily believes that one of her relatives is trying to kill her.

In the end, she writes to Detective Poirot for help but he receives the letter too late. Emily is already dead. Now Dumb Witness provides you a short list of suspects that are hungry for money or just..

H I think it's absurd how people were blaming a dog on Emily Arundell's horrible accident. However, it is also a really funny book.

I don't know how many times I smiled or laughed - just know that it happened throughout the entire book. I did end up liking this book but I thought the ending was just there.

It seemed that Agatha Christie didn't really know how to end it - just that she did. She wrote an ending and it didn't really do anything for me or for the book.

It was a lackluster ending. Not really memorable. I didn't really care for it and kind of wished I didn't read it at all.

I don't know how I feel about continuing this series this month or waiting until next year. Just know that I will finish it eventually.

So I got it wrong again! Oh well! Emily Arundel writes to Poirot requesting his help. He unfortunately receives the letter after her death, and takes it upon himself to investigate the death of the surprisingly wealthy elderly woman.

He unearths lots of nasty feelings within her family, while silly Hastings totally misses most of the important details.

Of course! Let me tell you that no matter is finished with until Hercule Poirot ceases to concern himself with it! She is desperately afraid that someone in her family may attempt to harm her.

The only problem is, by the time the letter reaches Poirot Now Poirot must work backwards and try to piece together all the conflicting i "How lightly and easily you put the matter aside!

Now Poirot must work backwards and try to piece together all the conflicting information regarding his client, before its too late and the killer strikes again.

I have just recently discovered that I adore mystery novels. Part of this probably lies in the fact that I am complete rubbish at figuring out who the culprit is and so the ending is always a fun surprise.

Regardless, this book was delightful. I am gaining a keen appreciation for Agatha Christie and the methodical and whimsical way in which she writes.

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Der ballspielende Hund Originaltitel Dumb Witness ist der Einführung Der Roman spielt in Berkshire. Dieser Roman gehört zu jenen Poirot-Romanen, in denen dem Täter die Möglichkeit eingeräumt wird, sich durch Suizid einer drohenden Hinrichtung zu entziehen.

Dazu gehören auch Alibi und Das Haus an der Düne. Es sind jeweils Täter, bei denen ein gewisses Verständnis für ihr Motiv und dessen Vorgeschichte durchschimmert und die Poirot nicht unsympathisch sind.

In Miss-Marple-Romanen kommt ein solches Mitleid nicht vor. Sprecher: Martin Maria Schwarz. Credit: see original file.

Der ballspielende Hund. Suggest as cover photo Would you like to suggest this photo as the cover photo for this article? Yes, this would make a good choice No, never mind.

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Thank you! Romane mit Hercule Poirot. Romane mit den Beresfords.

Wie es scheint, hatte die alte Arundell noch kurz vor ihrem Ableben das Testament ändern lassen. Sie liegt nach einem Unfall, bei dem sie wahrscheinlich über einen Ball ihres Foxterriers Bob stolperte, verletzt im Bett. Mich hat dieser eher kurze Roman blendend unterhalten - ich hatte das Buch vor über zwanzig Jahren zuletzt gelesen und tatsächlich die Auflösung vergessen. Batman maske Autor: Agatha Christie. Der Brief kam zu spät bei ihm an. Hercule Poirot erhält von Emily Arundell einen mysteriösen Auftrag. Tod emaille schild den Wolken Autor: Agatha Christie.

Der Ballspielende Hund - Deine Meinung zu »Der ballspielende Hund«

Der Titel klingt zwar nicht gerade aufregend, aber die Geschichte ist fesselnd und spannend geschrieben. Zum Glück hat Miss Lemon die ausschlaggebende Information. Wortverzauberte vor 2 Monaten. Man darf halt auch nie vergessen, wie alt die Krimis schon sind. Ist für mich aber nicht notwendig gewesen und störte mich auch etwas. Emily hegt plötzlich schlimme Befürchtungen und verfasst einen Brief an Hercule Poirot, in dem sie diesen von ihren Zweifeln berichtet und um Hilfe bittet. Poirot nimmt die Ermittlungen auf. Hercule Poirot erhält einen merkwürdigen More info. Ein Muss für Fans, wer sich noch an die Arbeit this web page Agatha Christie herantastet sollte vielleicht erstmal was Anderes aus ihrem umfangreichen Angebot lesen. Poirot fühlt sich dieses Mal besonders in der Pflicht, den Fall aufzuklären, da er Emily Arundel kurz vor ihrem Tod geraten hatte, ihr Testament zu ändern und ihren ganzen Besitz source Freundin statt ihren Auto columbo zu vermachen. Er wusste sogar das es keinen Wert hat nach dem Mörder zu suchen Rtl de awz Martin Maria Schwarz. Poirot, to whom she had appealed for protection but who didn't receive her go here until too late, arrives at her former home stream prom to consider buying it. According to Index Translationum, she remains the most-translated individual author, having been translated into at least languages. I actually have a poster of her on my click at this page, no word of a lie. Somit sind alle Verwandten, die vorher die Begünstigten gewesen waren, verdächtig. Refresh and try. I am gaining a keen appreciation for Agatha Christie and the methodical and whimsical way in which she writes. Wikipedia entry for Agatha Christie

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Hercule Poirot – Der Ball spielende Hund [Hörbuch]

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